Funding Announcements

Funding Announcements

  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
    November 7, 2017
    The International Dissertation Research Fellowship Program (IDRF) of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) supports the next generation of scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences pursuing research that advances knowledge about non-US cultures and societies. The program is open to a range of methodologies, including research in archives and manuscript collections, fieldwork and surveys, and quantitative data collection.
    The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences--regardless of citizenship--enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins. Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals which focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible.
    The IDRF program provides support for nine to twelve months of dissertation research. Applicants from select humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for a shorter international component within the nine to twelve months of support. Fellowship amounts vary depending on the research plan, with a per-fellowship average of $21,000. Click here for more details.
    Date posted: 9/13/2017 | View listing
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  • Russell Sage Foundation
    December 1, 2017
    The Russell Sage Foundation offers small awards to support high quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators (Ph.D. students and recent graduates) to enter this developing field. There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the principal investigator, and the proposed research may address any topic in behavioral economics. However, projects must contribute to the Foundation's mission to improve the social and living conditions in the U.S. Appropriate projects will demonstrate explicit use of psychological concepts in the motivation of the research design and the preparation of the results. Experimental projects which do not have substantial behavioral content (such as market experiments testing neoclassical ideas) or substantial economic content (such as psychology experiments with no economic choices or strategic or market implications) will not be funded. For more information click here.
    Date posted: 3/16/2017 | View listing
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  • Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago
    December 1, 2017
    Thanks to the generous support of the Doris Duke Charitable FoundationChapin Hall at the University of Chicago is pleased to offer the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being (formerly called the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect). These fellowships are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation's ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.
    Doris Duke fellows receive an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Up to 15 fellowships are awarded annually. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.
    Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-social work, child development, public health, medicine, public policy, education, economics, psychology, and epidemiology. In order to maximize the opportunities for interdisciplinary learning, Chapin Hall is building a sustainable peer learning network among the fellows and mentors through a series of in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls, and social networking opportunities.
    Date posted: 8/15/2017 | View listing
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  • ABMRF The Foundation for Alcohol Research
    February 15, 2018
    The foundation encourages basic and clinical research, including epidemiology. Examples of valid topics include factors influencing underage drinking, the mechanisms of alcohol-related organ injury, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, and the effects of alcohol on general health. Areas of particular interest include studies on how particular patterns of consumption (quantity of alcohol consumed, types of alcoholic beverages consumed, frequency of consumption, and context) are related to health and behavioral outcomes; and interdisciplinary, bioinformatics, and other approaches to genetic and environmental factors that influence the patterns of consumption of alcoholic beverages and related consequences. The foundation does not support research on treatment of complications related to advanced alcoholism. However, research involving treatment paradigms intended to elucidate the pathogenesis of alcohol-related problems will be considered. Grants are made to academic and research institutions in the United States, Canada, and South Africa, not individuals. Priority is given to projects led by young investigators, but the foundation does not support students or trainees in pre- or postdoctoral programs. Grants of up to $75,000 a year will be awarded for either one or two years. See the AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research website for complete program guidelines and application instructions.
    Date posted: 5/16/2017 | View listing
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Other External Funding

  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
    November 7, 2017
    The International Dissertation Research Fellowship Program (IDRF) of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) supports the next generation of scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences pursuing research that advances knowledge about non-US cultures and societies. The program is open to a range of methodologies, including research in archives and manuscript collections, fieldwork and surveys, and quantitative data collection.
    The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences--regardless of citizenship--enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins. Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals which focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible.
    The IDRF program provides support for nine to twelve months of dissertation research. Applicants from select humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for a shorter international component within the nine to twelve months of support. Fellowship amounts vary depending on the research plan, with a per-fellowship average of $21,000. Click here for more details.
    Date posted: 9/13/2017 | View listing
    share
  • Russell Sage Foundation
    December 1, 2017
    The Russell Sage Foundation offers small awards to support high quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators (Ph.D. students and recent graduates) to enter this developing field. There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the principal investigator, and the proposed research may address any topic in behavioral economics. However, projects must contribute to the Foundation's mission to improve the social and living conditions in the U.S. Appropriate projects will demonstrate explicit use of psychological concepts in the motivation of the research design and the preparation of the results. Experimental projects which do not have substantial behavioral content (such as market experiments testing neoclassical ideas) or substantial economic content (such as psychology experiments with no economic choices or strategic or market implications) will not be funded. For more information click here.
    Date posted: 3/16/2017 | View listing
    share
  • ABMRF The Foundation for Alcohol Research
    February 15, 2018
    The foundation encourages basic and clinical research, including epidemiology. Examples of valid topics include factors influencing underage drinking, the mechanisms of alcohol-related organ injury, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, and the effects of alcohol on general health. Areas of particular interest include studies on how particular patterns of consumption (quantity of alcohol consumed, types of alcoholic beverages consumed, frequency of consumption, and context) are related to health and behavioral outcomes; and interdisciplinary, bioinformatics, and other approaches to genetic and environmental factors that influence the patterns of consumption of alcoholic beverages and related consequences. The foundation does not support research on treatment of complications related to advanced alcoholism. However, research involving treatment paradigms intended to elucidate the pathogenesis of alcohol-related problems will be considered. Grants are made to academic and research institutions in the United States, Canada, and South Africa, not individuals. Priority is given to projects led by young investigators, but the foundation does not support students or trainees in pre- or postdoctoral programs. Grants of up to $75,000 a year will be awarded for either one or two years. See the AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research website for complete program guidelines and application instructions.
    Date posted: 5/16/2017 | View listing
    share

Student Only Funding

  • Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago
    December 1, 2017
    Thanks to the generous support of the Doris Duke Charitable FoundationChapin Hall at the University of Chicago is pleased to offer the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Promotion of Child Well-Being (formerly called the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect). These fellowships are designed to identify and develop a new generation of leaders interested in and capable of creating practice and policy initiatives that will enhance child development and improve the nation's ability to prevent all forms of child maltreatment.
    Doris Duke fellows receive an annual stipend of $30,000 for up to two years to support the completion of their dissertation and related research at their academic institution. Up to 15 fellowships are awarded annually. Fellows are guided by an academic mentor whom they select; fellows also identify a policy or practice mentor to assist them in better understanding how to frame their research questions with an eye toward maximizing policy and practice relevance.
    Because the promotion of child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment require knowledge and collaboration from diverse fields, the program is multidisciplinary in scope and approach. Fellows are selected from a range of academic disciplines, including—-but not limited to—-social work, child development, public health, medicine, public policy, education, economics, psychology, and epidemiology. In order to maximize the opportunities for interdisciplinary learning, Chapin Hall is building a sustainable peer learning network among the fellows and mentors through a series of in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls, and social networking opportunities.
    Date posted: 8/15/2017 | View listing
    share