Joseph Kable in the News

  • Omnia interviewed Joseph Kable, PSC & PARC researcher and Baird Term Professor of Psychology, on why humans can’t seem to make the commitment to slow climate change.

  • Joseph Kable and co-authors have published an article in the Journal of Neuroscience about choices adolescents make in relation to brain development.

  • Joseph Kable and his co-authors' research on risk tolerance linked to amygdala and prefrontal cortex brain regions has just been published in Neuron, Forbes and Penn News. The structure and function of the brain—specifically the amygdala, the prefrontal cortex, and the connections between the two—are linked to how willing a person is to take risks, according to their new research. “It’s a feature of decision-making,” Kable says, “that has manifold effects throughout the lifespan.”

  • Joseph Kable and co-authors at the University of Pennsylvania have publish a study that, not only did commercial brain training with Lumosity™ have no effect on decision-making, it also had no effect on cognitive function beyond practice effects on the training tasks. During the last decade, commercial brain-training programs have risen in popularity, offering people the hope of improving their cognitive abilities through the routine performance of various “brain games” that tap cognitive functions such as memory, attention and cognitive flexibility. Ready the study in Journal of Neuroscience and Penn Today.

  • University of Pennsylvania researchers Joseph Kable and Trishala Parthasarathi wanted to understand why and whether that quality could change within an individual. Read their study in Frontiers in Psychology and Penn Today.

  • Joseph Kable of the School of Arts & Sciences, Caryn Lerman of the Perelman School of Medicine and its Abramson Cancer Center, and Leah Bernardo, also of Medicine are highlighted in Philadelphia Inquirer for researching how Lumosity affects brain activity. Read more here.

  • In the New York Times, Joseph Kable suggests "even brief reveries pondering future events might help reduce [hyperbolic] discounting’s effects."

  • Joseph Kable's research on self-control is discussed in a The New York Times Sunday Review.

  • Caryn Lerman and Joseph Kable have been awarded a $2 million grant through the National Cancer Institute initiative called “Provocative Questions,” which will allow them to study how the brain’s cognitive control system can be enhanced to improve decision-making processes that contribute to risky behaviors.

  • John MacDonald comments on research about the “crime-fighting ability of trees.”